Lifestyle and Dietary Revelations Part II

In this bi-weekly newsletter, I share with you lifestyle- and diet-related things that just blew my mind when I first found out about them.

Low blood sugar = Nightmares

If you eat something sugary or a big carb-heavy meal before going to sleep, in all likelihood your blood sugar will drop in the middle of the night.

This is because the carbohydrates in your meal spike your insulin levels which in turn lower your blood glucose/sugar levels because the insulin is taking the glucose from your bloodstream and feeding it into your cells.

But after a carb heavy meal or even after a lot of sweets, there is way too much sugar in your bloodstream and hence a huge insulin secretion follows.

What ends up happening is the insulin pushes the glucose into your cells but if you’re asleep and you’re not eating (i.e. supplying glucose to your bloodstream) then your running out of sugar in your blood meaning you end up with low blood sugar.

From experience, I’ve realised that this leads to some really weird dreams and nightmares.

These dreams tire your mind out and upon waking up you don’t feel as well-rested.

How to avoid nightmares caused by low blood sugar?

The body doesn’t process carbs well at night so it is wise to lower your carb intake after 6pm if you don’t need the energy. If you eat too many carbs in the evening, you end up stocking up on energy/calories which, if not used, end up turning into fat.

Dr Mark Hyman, author of The Ultramind Solution, suggests you don’t eat for up to 3 hours before going to sleep.

In case you get hungry or are in the mood for a snack, the best way to go is to choose a low-glycaemic carbohydrate with protein and/or some form of fibre that will slow the digestion of the carb and will release glucose into your bloodstream at a slow and steady pace.

A common night snack is a handful of almonds, egg whites, Greek yoghurt etc. Cottage cheese has casein which slows carb absorption.

Side note: Aspirin lowers blood sugar! I had some pretty scary nightmares on the two nights that I took aspirin when I wasn’t feeling too well.

High Pressure Processing (HPP)

HPP is a form of pasteurisation that uses high pressure to pasteurise food.

I learnt a lot about HPP from this pretty cool website.

Here are the key takeaways from it:

HPP heats juices
High pressure creates heat that changes enzyme and protein structure of the juice.

HPP reduces microbial content
Pasteurising food kills bad bacteria to increase food shelf life.

With HPP, even the good bacteria (a.k.a probiotics/ commensal microflora) is killed off. Which is a shame because commensal microflora safeguards us against pathogenic microorganisms.

Some nutrients in juices just aren’t shelf-stable
HPP is used to extend the shelf-life of juices but some nutrients in juices aren’t shelf-stable so anything beyond 3 days and the nutritional value of juices are affected considerably.

Antioxidant, enzyme, and vitamin content degrade as juice is allowed to sit.

Which nicely leads us into the next point:

Be wary of nutrition labels on HPP juices

Why?

Because the vitamin content for the nutrition label was determined shortly after juice extraction.

Which means that the nutritional value on these labels are no longer valid information the longer the juice has been sitting around.

Know where to buy your juices

All juices available in gyms, supermarkets, and spas are required to be pasteurised.

You won’t be getting the best nutritional bang for your buck if you buy these.

How to drink juice

Having read all that about HPP you might be wondering well how should I drink juice to make sure I’m getting all the health and cleansing benefits?

According to this website, cold-pressed juice is the way to go:

“When drinking juice for cleansing, cold-pressed juice is the gold standard when the juice is fresh, organic, and consumed within 5 days of being pressed (…)

Cold pressing extracts juice from fruits and vegetables to retain more of the phytonutrients, vitamins, enzymes but only for a certain amount of time.”

To ensure your juice is as nutrient dense as possible, cold press raw organic fruits and/or vegetables as soon as you can.

P.S. Thanks for reading and feel free to subscribe to my email list.

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